Outstanding Keynotes & Critical Conversations Featured in National eXtension Virtual Conference

eXtension will conduct its first National eXtension Virtual Conference, entitled A Symposium on Working Differently, on October 18, 19, & 20, 2010. In addition to three outstanding keynote speakers, 20 Critical Conversations, concurrent sessions that will create opportunities for interaction and dialog between participants, have been scheduled. Sessions will be offered at two online locations in two “rooms”. All Keynote addresses and mediated conversations will be held in Room 1: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

Critical conversations are identified by Room 1: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1 or Room 2: http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room2. Use the appropriate web address to attend. All sessions will be recorded and archived for later viewing at extension.org/learn.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2010
ALL TIMES EASTERN

2:00 p.m.—WELCOME AND INTRODUCTIONS

2:10—Becoming Visible in the New Media Ecology, LEE RAINIE, Director of the Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project, will discuss the Project’s latest findings about how Americans use the internet and their cell phones. He will discuss how organizations can function in the new media ecology by becoming nodes in users’ social networks.
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

Rainie

2:55—Break

3:05—Mediated Conversation with Lee Rainie
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

3:50—Break

4:00—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Educating Others about Social Networking–This session will provide the opportunity to learn about an interactive, educational display, research project, and supporting website used at a major state event (and beyond) as a way to find out how people are using/or not using social networks. The research results will be shared, and the session will facilitate discussion about implications for extending Extension education through social networks. [Dee Love, Lorraine Kisselburgh, Russell Query, Purdue University]

ROOM 2. Is the Cooperative Extension’s Mission and Funding Model Compatible with Programming on the Worldwide Web? The traditional funding model for Cooperative Extension is to have financial contributions from local, state and federal governments, while being accountable to local constituents. Can we move to more online programming if we are still expected to only show, or to emphasize, local programming and local impact? Is information online- shared with a worldwide audience- still meeting the mission of a land grant model? If not, should our model change? Come join a conversation to discuss your experiences or thoughts about this dilemma. [Kara Newby, Jerry Thomas, Ohio State University]

4:45—Wrap Up

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2010

11:00 a.m.—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Tracking Impact of Personal Finance FAQs— A process that started in April 2008 as a “quick and easy” effort to get started with program evaluation for a new eXtension CoP has begun to yield valuable information. “We would like your feedback on this personal finance frequently asked question.” Anyone who accesses one of the personal finance FAQs on eXtension has seen that sentence at the end of the FAQ. The feedback received shows how users are using FAQs and where additions are needed to make the information more useful. This session will highlight how this evaluation process works and how the CoP uses the information gathered. [Janet Bechman, Purdue University; Barbara O’Neill, Rutgers University]

ROOM 2. Using New Ways to Instruct and Inform Beginning Farmers–Throughout New York State there has been an increase in interest and desire to start farming by individuals that have little or no farm expertise. To provide learning opportunities for those interested in farming, an initiative was launched to develop a variety of distance learning materials. Website, online courses and webinars have been developed on specific topics with the list of courses being offered expanding. It is the hope of the facilitators to have a dialogue among those participating to share ideas on how distance learning has been and could be used to educate and inform people interested in farming. [Stephen Hadcock, Laura Biasillo, Erica Frenay, Daniel Welch, Cornell University]

11:45—Break

11:55—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Social Media: Whose Reputation Is at Stake? Twitter, Facebook, blogs and other social media outlets have made it easy for us to write any time and nearly anywhere, but whose reputation is on the line when we write? In a recent blog, Amber Naslund discussed the question of opinions voiced through social media. Our conversation, suitable for anyone who interacts with others using social media, will focus on personal and professional online identity. Is it important, or even possible, to have personal online identities that are separate from our professional ones? Does one affect the other? We hope to explore these and related questions with participants. [Virginia Morgan, Auburn University; Jennifer Jahedkar, Texas AgriLife Extension]

ROOM 2. Blurring Lines, Stretching Boundaries: A Conversation with eXtension CoP Members About Working Differently–The idea of working differently is often given lip service but not acted upon. Three CoP members will discuss how they are working differently and more effectively as a result of being involved with eXtension. This conversation will hopefully answer questions and motivate others to take the leap and get involved. [Mike Lambur, eXtension]

12:40 p.m.—Break

1:00— “Work is Learning; Learning Work: It’s the Network, Stupid” HAROLD JARCHE, Jarche Consulting & the Internet Time Alliance, helps organizations make sense of the Web for community building, collaboration, professional development and communication.
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

Jarche

1:45—Break

1:55—Mediated Conversation with Harold Jarche
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

2:40—Break

3:00—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Creating Community Cohesiveness and Examining Barriers to Working Differently: A Discussion of the All About Blueberries and Grape CoP Experiences— The All About Blueberries CoP has been public from September 29, 2010. The Grape CoP will become public January 2011. Team leaders from both CoPs will discuss ways and means to lead their teams virtually to remain on task and meet content goals. We will discuss: how the AAB CoP will expand the team to include members from all 50 states; how to sustain the CoP post grant funding; motivating CoP members to meet content creation goals, & barriers encountered by CoP leaders. [Kathleen Kelsey, Eric Stafne, & Lane Greer, Oklahoma State University; Denise Attaway, Louisiana State University AgCenter

ROOM 2. Engaging Learners Through Social Media Outreach: Working Smarter, Not Harder— This presentation will provide a roadmap of how the Financial Security for All (FSA) Community of Practice (CoP) developed its social media efforts to get its content into the hands of people and some useful thoughts for CoPs that are thinking of increasing their level of involvement with social media. Also, we include some principles from a recent FINRA conference on using social media and social marketing to improve financial education. [Andrew Zumwalt & Michael Ravenscraft, University of Missouri; Barbara O’Neill, Rutgers University]

3:45—Break

3:55—Critical Conversations
ROOM 1. Assessing Impact of eXtension or Social Media Programming— Those associated with various eXtension activities realize that web communications is transforming the way we work. However, there is not a precedent for how individuals working in Extension can report “impact” or other measures for the relative success of their online programs. Without a means to do this, the use of web-based Extension is not incentivized. We will be discussing how this is being handled at various institutions and describe various approaches people are taking to assess the value of their online programming. [Christoper Raines & Jeffrey Hyde, Penn State University; Traci Naile, Texas AgriLife Extension]

ROOM 2. Expanding Women in Agriculture Programs Through Creative Networking— This session will discuss the program modification and delivery of a national women in agriculture education program – Annie’s Project. In 2010 Annie’s Project extended from one site to 9 sites. This expansion was due to the outcomes, interest and enthusiasm for the program by coordinators and participants. It was important for us to bring Annie’s Project to other women in the region. Incorporating technology into programs has allowed us to communicate more effectively, reach broader audiences and still get interaction and positive results. It is a unique collaboration with facilitators and hybrid model of face to face and distance learning. [Shannon Dill, Jenny Rhodes, Brad Paleg & Nan Stenzel, University of Maryland]

4:40—Break

4:50—Critical Conversation

ROOM 1. Adapting Enterprise 2.0 for Extension System— Enterprise 2.0 concepts are based on the adoption of Web 2.0 technologies by organizations. However the focus is not as much on how to use the technology, but rather what technology tools help with contemporary organizational structure and change. The session is targeted to Extension professionals that have tried new technology tools and are ready to better understand how they impact Extension work. We use a series of reaction questions to reflect and discuss how Enterprise 2.0 relates to our internal organization structure and how we engage with clientele. [Jerry Thomas, Kara Newby, Andy Kleinschmidt, Mark Light & Emily Rhoades, Ohio State University]

5:35—Wrap Up

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 2010

11:00 a.m.—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. An Unusual Diversity Conversation to Think and Work Differently— This seminar suggests discrimination stems from one having a position of privilege over another. Regarding racial discrimination, privilege typically resides on the side of whites, or those accepted as white. This is known as whiteness or white privilege. This is not passing blame, shame or promoting guilt–while we are not responsible for what happened in the past, we are responsible for today and the future. The goal is not to eliminate white people or white culture, but to empower whites to struggle against whiteness, thus improving Extension efforts and ultimately society. [Joseph Maiorano & Kathy Lechman, Ohio State University]

ROOM 2. From Tenuous to Tenacious about Tenure Documentation— This session will present a progression of understanding and the implementation strategies of interacting within the eXtension environment as it relates to tenure pursuit. The target audience is all people – administrators, educators and eXtension staff – who recognize the potential conflict of “working differently” against documenting scholarship traditionally and who aim to be part of the solution. This will be a first person account from a recent tenure packet submission that allows educators and administrators concerned with nuances of the tenure track to identify best practices and to avoid pitfalls in the context of working and publishing within eXtension. [Megan O’Neil, University of Maryland]

11:45—Break

11:55—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Engaging Communities with Photovoice & Participatory Video—This workshop will provide an overview of photovoice and participatory video which are two participatory based research methods that are part of a growing interest in using creative, dynamic tools with people in the development of their communities. The workshop aims to highlight how the methods offer the potential to facilitate skill acquisition, self-expression, discussion and debate and to instigate social change through exhibitions of the work produced. Participants of this workshop will learn activities as well as strategies and tips regarding developing and implementing both methods in their communities. The target audience is Extension educators who work with youth and or adults. [Julie Tritz, West Virginia University]

ROOM 2. Using a Blog to Reach Master Gardeners— The Master Gardener Program has been part of Extension since 1972 and communication methods have evolved across county lines – and across state lines. Today, we must communicate statewide and nationwide – quickly. Social media tools are economical, efficient, and relatively simple to learn. Blogs such as my blog for MN volunteers “Over the Backyard Fence”, and the national EMG Blog have proven to be simple, fast and satisfying methods of communication. However, blogs must be promoted, and it may take time for people to use them. If you are utilizing blogs, this is a good session to attend. [Julie Weisenhorn, University of Minnesota]

1:00 p.m.—“Me, We and the Network: Weaving Participation “ NANCY WHITE, Full Circle Associates. Digital tools give us new ways of “being together” for work, learning and even play! While we used to think in terms of our “communities” or associations, we now have access to a wide range of forms, from independent, free-range learning, to bounded, intentional groups and out to far flung, diverse and loosely connected networks. These offer us connections via relationships to peers, and through content. In our time together, lets explore strategic value of this continuum for extension folk and your wider constituents.
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

White

1:45—Break

1:55—Mediated Conversation with NANCY WHITE
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/broadcasts/room1

2:40—Break

3:00—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. Incorporating Sense of Place, Values, and Personal Perspectives into Extension Teaching and Learning To address the non-tangible or tacit elements of learning and behavior, panelists will present four methods to help educators and participants in extension programs gain a better understanding of their and others’ values and perspectives that color a learning situation. The use of visual surveys, applied phenomenology, scenario-planning, and sense of place metrics are covered in this conversation about reaching out to engage participants in new and more reflective ways. How can Extension incorporate understanding values, personal perspectives, sense of place, and other non-tangible or tacit elements of learning and behavior into Extension teaching? [Mike Reichenbach, University of Minnesota; Sanford Smith & Allyson Brownlee Muth, Penn State University]

ROOM 2. Leveraging the Educational Potential of Online Networks–This interactive session will encourage discussions around how we have worked in the past, how we are working now, and how people use online networks to communicate, learn, and work. Specifically, we will be investigating effective ways of working, challenges in the workplace, learning, communicating and sharing within and outside of Extension. We will also discuss the participants’ observations in changes in their own and others’ way of working and communicating. We will discuss how leveraging the connections and acquired knowledge made through networks strengthens personal and organizational performance. [Anne Adrian & Karen Jeannette, eXtension]

3:45—Break

3:55—Critical Conversations

ROOM 1. 3D Immersive Educational Opportunities in Second Life— With continued budget cuts, F2F programming is not always feasible. 3D immersive environments may serve as a practical, inexpensive, and efficient mode of delivery for existing F2F programming. In the last 60 days, 1,362,644 residents have logged into SL to develop, design and create. As in Real Life, much of what residents do is obtain the education necessary to design their world- many using SL as a “trial run” for real life. Extension can tap this market of learners by providing reliable, research-based programming people can use immediately. Join us to see how Extension is using SL to educate. Arrive ready to share your experiences as well as comments/concerns. We look forward to a dynamic and enlightening discussion. [Marissa Stone, University of Georgia; LuAnn Phillips, eXtension]

ROOM 2. How to Engage Clientele Effectively Using Social Media Technologies–This session will explain how University of Kentucky Extension Agents are using Facebook to reach clientele and improve their programs. Agents will give specific examples of how Facebook has become an integral part of their programming and how they plan to use it in the future. College IT Staff will discuss their efforts to provide resources for CES personnel so that they can better understand and utilize social media. IT Staff will share how they created a “Social Media Hub” that is a one stop location for Extension personnel to find resources regarding social media. [Steve Garner, Chris Canjar, Rich Phelps, Mindy McCulley, Betsy Ann Tracy, Melissa Goodman, Kristin Goodin, University of Kentucky]

4:40—Break

4:50—Critical Conversation

ROOM 1. A Framework for Decision Making–Most of the problems that we face today are complex. Traditional, and more linear approaches to decision making are inadequate for addressing these issues. This session will help participants to categorize problems, and to use approaches for their resolution that are more effective and appropriate. [Kevin Gamble, Anne Adrian, Beth Raney, eXtension; Jerry Thomas, Ohio State University; Rhonda Conlon, North Carolina State University]

5:35—Wrap Up