Feral Hogs Team Honored with CES Working Differently Award

From left to right:  Dennis Calvin, eXtension Governing Committee Chair/Penn State University Extension director presents a 2014 Working Differently in Extension Award to Amy Hays, Mark Tyson, Jim Cathey, and Denise Garza.
From left to right: Dennis Calvin, eXtension Governing Committee Chair/Penn State University Extension director presents a 2014 Working Differently in Extension Award to Amy Hays, Mark Tyson, Jim Cathey, and Denise Garza.

SACRAMENTO, Calif. – The Feral Hogs Community of Practice (CoP) was recognized by eXtension with a 2014 Working Differently in Extension award. The award was presented here at the National eXtension Conference/National Extension Directors & Administrators joint meeting, March 26.

“The Working Differently in Extension Award recognizes a team or group for its engagement with clientele, co-workers, and others in new and different ways. It lauds the demonstrable impacts made, both quantitatively and qualitatively as they do their work. And, the award provides an opportunity to show how this group works online and within a learning network,” said Elbert Dickey, eXtension Executive Director.

The Feral Hogs CoP members recognized included: Amy Hays, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service; Rebecca McPeake, University of Arkansas; Samuel Smallidge, New Mexico State University; Mark Smith, Auburn University; Jim Cathey, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service; Jack Mayer, US Department of Energy; Russell Stevens, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation; Joseph Corn, University of Georgia; Will Moseley, The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation; Billy Higginbotham, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service; Jared Timmons, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service; Mark Tyson, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service; Denise Garza, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service and Dan Gaskins, Texas A & M AgriLife Extension Service.

The Feral Hog team concentrated on the biology, control, adaptive management, economics, disease risks and the human interface of feral hogs across the United States. By training face-to-face and online they took a group approach to create content and connect resources faster and with more volume than ever before. They developed and released 103 frequently asked questions, 54 articles, a Feral Hog CoP Facebook page with more than 1,600 likes, a Flickr photo sharing platform,
an Ask an Expert system, and they conducted four national webinars reaching over 500 people.

“Reaching a larger audience than any one person could do in any single state is a real benefit of participating in the Feral Hog Community of Practice,” said Terry Meisenbach, eXtension Communications and Marketing leader.